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Monthly Archives: October 2018

Climate Change

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Yeah, I’m going to go there. I can’t ignore the effects on us. The rain. It’s so different these days. The amount. The impact.

The garden is affected the most. Tomatoes were a mess. Mushy. Split. Not producing because of the lack of sunshine. The other indicator. The tromboncino. Which loved the extra moisture and produced far beyond what I could get in the past.

Monsters that grew in no time. Like this one that went from nothing to 3 1/2 pounds in less than a week,

This was a crazy year for our gardeners. Already there have been at least 10% giving notice of leaving. Many first time gardeners disappointed with the results of their labor. So many rotten vegetables, and out of control weeds.

As for other local input, we hear from our winery friends that their harvests have been less than stellar. No red wines at all from one of our favorites.

When I go to the local weather website I see we are less than one inch from the highest yearly total in the 21 years they have been recording the weather. 51.7 inches right now. 52+ in 2011 when we had a hurricane and tropical storm. We still have 20% of the year left and it is going to rain tomorrow.

As I take stock from my garden, and plan for the future, I have to account for these changes. What works now? Do I change what I plant? We have what I call a subtropical climate with intense rain. Onions can’t handle this rain. Melons rot and split. Only my cherry tomatoes did well this summer and all my heirlooms struggled.

The okra likes the climate. The rhubarb suffered. Cucumbers and zucchini, other than the tromboncino, rotted. The asparagus produced far longer than in the past, because of the excessive rain.

I am just a simple gardener. Not trying to make a living from the land. Imagine what these changes are doing to the farmers in the area. What do they plant? Humid, rainy days impact their livelihood. Washed out fields. Our Community Supported Agriculture has survived thanks to its size and diversity, but small farms with limited plantings had reduced yields.

We can’t bury our heads in the sand and ignore it.